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Recently the provincial government lifted many of the mask mandates. Until further notice, we are continuing to require everyone entering our clinic to wear a mask at this time.
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Why a Vision Screening Is Not Enough

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Why Vision Screening is Not Enough

Did you know that your child needs to master 17 different visual skills to succeed in reading, learning and sports? Basic vision screening results don’t test for any of these skills and therefore are not sufficient to rule out all vision problems possibly impacting your child.

The purpose of pediatric vision screenings is to detect refractive errors and eye diseases, not to identify a lack of vital vision-related skills. Undiagnosed vision problems, including reduced vision skills, cause one in ten children to experience learning difficulties and can impact other areas in life, such as sports.

Provide your children with the care and tools needed for better vision and successful learning. Contact Dr. Shirley Ha for a functional vision exam to assess their full range of vision functionality and determine the adequate treatment options needed to improve your child’s school and sports achievements.

Vision Screenings Don’t Reveal Much

Basic vision screenings, such as those offered at schools, usually test only for visual acuity — the sharpness of vision in each eye. Some may include additional tests such as lazy eye, eye coordination and color blindness. Though your child may pass all vision screening exams with flying colors and may excel in seeing the vision charts, he or she may still struggle with visual-motor skills, eye tracking skills, have poor peripheral vision, or have other undetected vision problems.

Following a vision screening, many questions may remain unanswered: does your child have sufficient control over eye movements? Are both eyes properly aligned when focusing? How is your child’s depth perception? These are but a few of the skills that play a critical role in learning and functioning at our best in this fast-paced world.

What Symptoms Should You Look Out For?

As a parent, it is critical that you remain alert to any behavior that could signal a vision issue. Keep an eye out for any of the following symptoms and ask teachers to do the same.

  • Reading below grade level
  • Spelling or comprehension difficulties
  • Slow completion of tasks (homework etc.)
  • Messy handwriting
  • Quickly becoming tired when reading or avoiding reading tasks
  • Using fingers to track words while reading
  • Often skips words or lines when reading
  • Frequent falls or bumps into things
  • Experiences difficulty catching a ball or aiming
  • Struggles to stay focused
  • Experiences headaches at school or working on the computer
  • Squints or tilts the head when concentrating
  • Frequently rubs, covers or closes an eye when focusing on a target

Any of these could point to a deficit in certain visual skills required to perform well as a student, in sports or in every-day life.

The Impact of Undiagnosed Vision Issues

Vision quality can significantly impact the development of a child’s personality. Weak vision skills not only interfere with learning but can also reduce the child’s self-confidence and self-esteem.

The Importance of Visual Skills in Learning

About 80% of learning activities are based on vision. Both reading and writing, whether in a notebook, a chalkboard, whiteboard, or a computer, require complex visual skills. Simply seeing letters clearly in a book or on the board is not enough to enable a child to read and learn and thrive in school. A child has to be able to accurately and easily interpret what he or she sees in order to make sense of it. The eyes need to work together, focus simultaneously, track letters in a line and frequently refocus from near to far. Functional vision tests will assess any undiagnosed visual problems and track the course of improvement during vision therapy.

If your child has an undiagnosed vision problems or reduced visual function, he or she risks facing substantial obstacles in school, social interactions, sports and life.

However, these vision skills can be improved through vision therapy. Contact A-Ha Vision today to learn how vision therapy can help you or your child develop these essential vision skills.

Vision and Sports Performance

child clambing training One may think that for children with reading difficulties these would not have any impact on playing sports. The catch is that in sports, visual skills are equally important.

For example, reaction time, which is crucial in all ball games, depends on how fast the brain receives visual input and how accurate it is. This requires control over eye movements, proper depth perception and simultaneous focus, followed by hand-eye coordination to carry out the desired action.

Other sports call for high-level peripheral vision, visualization skills, color perception and other visual abilities.

Therefore, in the absence of well developed and strong visual skills, the child will also be unable to perform to their potential in both sports and academics.

Vision Problems and Confidence

Underachieving is frustrating, and as the child grows accustomed to failure, it can cause him or her to become further demotivated over the years. This explains why undiagnosed vision problems can lead to a child avoiding social activities, due to their lack of confidence and low self-esteem.

Moreover, children with undiagnosed visual issues are often misdiagnosed with a variety of ]behavior]-related syndromes, such as ADD/ADHD and dyslexia. In certain social environments, they may even be labeled as unintelligent or misbehaved, all of which can adversely impact their social status and emotional state.

Which Eye Conditions Lead to School and Work Difficulties?

Amblyopia ”Lazy-Eye”

girl on armchair In this condition, the brain “prefers” one eye over the other and disregards the image of the neglected eye. As a result, the brain supports the strong eye, causing the lazy eye to become weaker.

Developmental optometrists, such as Dr. Shirley Ha, use vision therapy to improve visual skills. This includes a variety of ocular exercises, prism glasses and special software to correct amblyopia in children and adults.

Convergence Insufficiency

To achieve clear vision, both eyes need to function in coordination with each other at all times — a process called binocular focusing. Convergence insufficiency refers to the inability to maintain a binocular focus at a near distance. This causes objects to appear in double, have a halo or blurry outline, or “float” on the page.

This condition cannot always be detected through vision screening, and therefore a more in-depth eye examination is required. Furthermore, glasses or surgery cannot correct this convergence insufficiency. It can only be improved using vision therapy which uses a series of tools and techniques to improve eye coordination abilities.

Focusing Problems

A person may have perfect vision while focusing, but what happens when the eyes can’t maintain their focus? What if changing the focus continuously, from distance to near and back, is challenging? If you have ever tried to adjust a camera lens manually, you will understand what it takes. Imagine having to constantly readjust your focus within milliseconds.

The ability to establish and sustain simultaneous focus is crucial for reading or copying from the board, as the eyes need to adjust from near to far, and back again. These problems can usually be successfully treated with vision therapy.

Eye-Tracking

Eye-tracking skills are essential for carrying out a number of common visual actions, such as following a moving object, directing hand movements and scanning for information. All of these can be highly challenging when eye movements are slow or irregular.

Because eye tracking problems don’t just disappear with age, it is important to treat the condition as early as possible. Designated eye exercises and vision therapy can help enhance these skills.

Strabismus “Crossed Eyes”

Strabismus, also known as an “eye turn” or “cross-eye”, is a condition characterized by the improper alignment of the eyes. One eye may look straight ahead, while the other turns inward, outward, upward, or downward.

Only in severe cases do the eyes actually “cross” or point to the nose. It’s more common for the eyes to point in different directions to focus, a deviation you may not even notice. However, it can lead your child to experience difficulty reading or concentrate on near tasks, resulting in exhaustion after homework or reading and headaches.

Depending on its cause and severity, vision therapy can effectively correct strabismus. In cases where surgery is required (due to weakened eye muscles), the two can be combined.

Good Vision is Much More Than 20/20

Clear ’20/20′ vision does not guarantee good vision. Find out if your child is equipped with the vision skills needed to thrive. Early detection through a functional vision exam at A-Ha Vision will enable your child to have better odds at success and a more positive, happy outlook on life.

Make an appointment today!

Our practice serves patients from Oakville, Burlington, Halton, and Mississauga, Ontario and surrounding communities.
Request A Functional Visual Exam
Find Out How We Can Help You! 905-582-4800
Learn More About Vision Therapy?
Vision Therapy Can Improve Reading Skills In Children Thumbnail.jpg

Vision Therapy For Improved Reading Skills In Children

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Functional Vision Exam

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Why a Functional Vision Exam Matters

A basic vision screening is just that, basic. It takes a functional vision exam to really understand how well a person can use their eyes.

Children (and adults too) often get a routine vision screening at school or with their pediatrician. When you or your child passes with ’20/20 eyesight’ or gets a prescription for corrective lenses, it’s common to assume that that means their vision is fine. However, a child can pass a vision screening but still have serious functional vision problems that can seriously impede their ability to read or learn.

In fact, vision function covers far more than seeing letters on a chart!

Adults and children alike use their eyes to interpret and interact with the world around them, meaning any visual problem that can significantly affect their essential life skills. Visual processing skills refer to the ability of an individual to accurately read, distinguish objects, maintain balance and remember visual inputs correctly. Underlying problems with visual processing, such as eye-tracking, teaming, fixation and more can seriously impede someone’s ability to learn and succeed in life.

Only a functional vision exam, also called a vision therapy assessment, can diagnose the visual problems that can detrimentally affect learning and quality-of-life and ensure that all essential visual skills are working correctly. Reduced visual skills can result in conditions such as convergence insufficiency, amblyopia (lazy eye), strabismus (crossed-eyes), blurred vision, double vision and other problems that affect an individual’s neuro-visual processing.

Functional Vision Exam vs Standard Vision Exam

kid running in the gardenStandard eye exams check for visual acuity and for the presence of eye disease. However, if a patient suffered a concussion or an acquired brain injury, he or she may have excellent vision acuity, yet experience regular headaches, eye strain, vertigo, or light sensitivity (photophobia). These are all signs of functional vision issues.

Therefore, if your child is doing well developmentally and scholastically and you just want to check their eye health and vision acuity, a regular eye exam may be sufficient. However, if your child is experiencing developmental or learning difficulties, then a Functional Vision Exam is in order. Furthermore, if as an adult, your visual symptoms and struggles are not resolved with corrective glasses or contacts, consider undergoing a Functional Eye Exam as well.

A-Ha Vision provides a comprehensive eye and functional vision examination that includes the assessment of visual information processing, binocular function and other essential visual skills.

Why Is a Functional Vision Exam Important?

All too often, it is an undiagnosed vision problem that causes problems with keeping focus at a distance (such as the board), or problems maintaining concentration. This can cause frustration and boredom and can often be responsible for an overlooked component of a child’s diagnosis with ADD/ADHD.

If your child is having difficulty with reading, homework, paying attention in class or is experiencing behavioral problems at school, it’s worth looking into. Contact A-Ha Vision for a functional vision exam, and let Dr. Shirley Ha get to the root of the issue.

What Is Included In a Functional Vision Exam?

A complete Functional Vision Exam can take anywhere from 45 to 60 minutes, or more. It begins with the review of the patient’s health and eye health history. This information will be used to tailor the Functional Vision Exam, which involves a series of tests on a wide range of visual skills, particularly learning-related vision issues. Other tests may be used for patients with developmental delays, brain injury and to examine sports vision.

kid playing outside

A Functional Vision Exam Tests for Important Visual Skills

Functional vision is about much more than just seeing the object. It’s about how your entire visual system works with your eyes and brain to react to and interact with the objects around you in real-time.

To evaluate vision health, the functional exam will test for:

Eye Teaming/Convergence/ Depth Perception / Binocular Vision

This is when the eyes align to focus on the same point and work as a team in a coordinated fashion. If eye teaming is poor, it can cause double vision, poor 3D depth perception, eyestrain and fatigue, especially during reading and close work.

Furthermore, poor eye teaming skills (which occurs among 5-10% of children) can result in difficulties with convergence and issues with depth perception.

  • Convergence insufficiency occurs when the eyes turn out while reading and doing close work. One needs to exercise immense effort to keep the eyes from drifting out, which, in turn, causes double vision and headaches.
  • Convergence excess is when the eyes tend to turn inwards during reading and close work. The symptoms resemble those in convergence insufficiency.

Visual Acuity- Nearsightedness

Can the child see clearly at close distances? This is essential for reading, writing and doing other close work.

Focusing / Accommodation

Can the child maintain clear vision at varying distances? Quick eye focus adjustment is crucial to learning, reading, writing and sports.

For example: When a child moves his or her gaze from the board to his book, the eye muscles must contract or tighten, which causes the eye lens shape to change, allows the child to see clearly. To look back at the board, the child needs to relax the focusing muscle for clear distance vision.

Eye Tracking and Eye Movement

In those with healthy vision, eyes move accurately, smoothly and quickly from place to place. These movements rapidly and accurately scan the visual environment for information. For example, if a child switches its gaze from the board to their book and back, the eyes need to accurately jump from one target to the next. This is also the case in reading when jumping from one word to another, or for following moving objects in sports. In fact, eye-hand coordination in any activity begins with accurate eye movements.

For example: tracking allows you to understand the distance between you and a car, and the speed at which it’s driving. It also allows you to judge the distance and, if you’re going to honk, how loud the honk should be.

Poor eye movement and eye-tracking abilities can result in poor reading skills, speed, comprehension and concentration.

Letter Reversal

Does your child confuse or reverse letters or words (b, d; p, q; saw, was) past a certain age? After the age of seven, such reversals may indicate a visual perceptual dysfunction. The sooner you address letter reversals, the less ingrained the habit will be.

Color Perception

Accurate perception of color is crucial as many activities and occupations are based on being able to discern between various colors. Color is often used to emphasize a point or provide instructions. In daily living, color perception is needed to match outfits, obey traffic lights and work in certain professions, such as graphic design. Red-green color deficiency is the most common form of color-blindness, where red and green are both seen as a brown hue, this condition primarily affects males, with up to one in 8 (12%) experiencing color vision problems.

smiling girl at the collageHow Vision Therapy Helps Functional Vision

Vision therapy is an individually-tailored regimen of eye exercises made to improve visual functions and retrain the brain to interpret visual input more accurately. It is typically compared to [physical therapy], but for the visual system.

Children with functional vision problems struggle to learn simply because their visual system is not functioning as it should. The good news is that once he or she is provided with the right diagnosis, a personalized vision therapy program can result in significant lasting improvements within a relatively short period of time.

Does One Automatically Require Vision Therapy Following a Functional Vision Exam?

No. The functional vision exam determines whether you or your child has a vision problem. Though it’s not uncommon to find out that the only requirement is a change in prescription, the testing is necessary to get to the root of a suspected visual problem. If it is determined that vision therapy is necessary in order to correct or fix a visual issue, then you and your doctor can discuss further.

Good Vision Is So Much More Than 20/20

Pediatricians, school vision screenings or certain organizations may be able detect basic visual aberrations, such as myopia, through a vision screening, but the only way to absolutely ensure that all the essential visual skills are operating correctly is by conducting a functional vision exam.

Contact A-Ha Vision today for a functional eye exam, or visit us with your concerns regarding your child’s vision, and we’ll be sure to find the best way to treat his or her visual problems.

Our practice serves patients from Oakville, Burlington, Halton, and Mississauga, Ontario and surrounding communities.
Request A Functional Visual Exam
Find Out How We Can Help You! 905-582-4800
Learn More About Vision Therapy?
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Vision Therapy For Improved Reading Skills In Children

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Why Visit a Developmental Optometrist

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Why Visit a Developmental Optometrist?

Optometrists can undertake post-graduate training and then gain years of experience in a certain area of eye care. Just as in other fields of medicine, there are different levels of care, knowledge and expertise in specific areas of optometry. Choosing an eye doctor who has the knowledge, training and experience to treat your specific eye condition can provide optimal results.

What is a Developmental Optometrist?

Developmental optometrists have a specific interest in the optometry field of vision therapy. These optometrists can diagnose and treating children and adults with learning difficulties, lazy eye, eye turns and much more. These optometrists are also known as ‘Behavioral Optometrists’ and seeing them can make a big difference in your treatment process and results.

Optometrists

A regular optometrist can diagnose various eye diseases, prescribe medication for treatment and provide prescriptions for eyeglasses or contact lenses.

Optometrists provide eye exams that evaluate a patient’s overall eye health, visual acuity (20/20, 20/40 etc) and the need for any corrective measures. While these are important aspects of vision, these tests don’t detect other visual disorders which can impact reading and learning. The general eye exam may not detect some vision problems, such as eye teaming (binocular vision), focusing, tracking and visual processing.

Developmental Optometrists

A developmental optometrist treats functional vision problems, including lazy eye, difficulties with binocular vision, eye movements and depth perception, as well as visual deficits following brain injuries. They use comprehensive evaluations and tools that test for vision problems that may go undetected using standard vision exams. Developmental optometrists base their work on the principle that vision can be developed and improved, and done so by using prisms, lenses and vision therapy.

Certain Behavioral Optometrists focus on specific areas, such as children’s vision, sports vision, vision problems impacting academic performance, stroke and head injury and Parkinson’s Disease.

Contact Dr. Shirley Ha today to assess whether you or your child’s life is being negatively impacted by vision issues.

Choosing an Optometrist vs. an Ophthalmologist for Contact Lenses ThumbnailWhat are the Goals of Behavioral Optometry?

  1. To keep vision and eye problems from developing or deteriorating
  2. To treat vision problems that have already developed
  3. To ensure that the visual abilities required for academic achievement, in work, in sports and when using computers, are well developed and working optimally

What Can I Expect During a Developmental Optometry Exam?

A developmental optometry evaluation will test for the following:

  1. Eye focusing – ability for the eyes to focus on an object or image from a distance
  2. Eye coordination – ensuring eyes work in tandem
  3. Eye tracking – ability to follow a moving object or text in a book
  4. Visual perception – checking that the brain properly ‘processes’ what the eyes see

The results will reveal which functions need improvement and will help the developmental optometrist determine which treatment option is best – whether vision therapy, special glasses and/or medicine.

Great Vision for Successful Development in School and Life

Developmental optometrists work with children and infants to ensure that these young patients develop the visual skills needed for success in school and on the sports field.

Children are particularly vulnerable to injuries that occur in school, during sports, swimming, or other extracurricular activities. Injuries such as concussions, falling down stairs or on the field, can cause vision and eye-hand coordination problems.

Children with learning difficulties can benefit from working with a developmental optometrist. For example, kids who struggle with reading are often assumed to have learning disabilities, when in reality, their learning issues can be attributed to vision problems. Moreover, incorrectly diagnosing a child with a learning disability can have many negative repercussions, on an emotional and social level, that could last for many years and all the way through adulthood.

Visual Tracking

Visual tracking is the ability to look at something and follow it as it moves or to track a line, such as when reading. When someone struggles with this movement, it can impact various activities, such as reading, comprehension or sports.

Examples of visual tracking problems in children could include:

  • Reversing letters: p and q, b and d, etc.
  • Using a finger to keep their place in a book
  • Skipping words or entire lines
  • Replacing words
  • Tilting the head
  • Leaning very close to a book or TV

Adults can also experience visual tracking problems, such as:

  • Squinting
  • Clumsy behavior
  • Repeatedly re-reading or losing their place in a book

If left untreated, these symptoms can deteriorate over time. As the child grows and develops, academic studies become more challenging, requiring more focus and concentration. This renders it even more critical to assess and treat any issues with the visual skills as soon as possible.

We Can Help Your Child Have Great Vision

Children who struggle with basic eye functioning can tire easily in class, which can be incorrectly diagnosed as ADHD. They tend to also fall behind in their work and don’t perform to their abilities in reading and writing tasks.

If any of this sounds like your child, contact A-Ha Vision and make an appointment with Dr. Shirley Ha today. The doctor can run tests to identify delays in childhood visual development that may have been missed by other practitioners.

Our practice serves patients from Oakville, Burlington, Halton, and Mississauga, Ontario and surrounding communities.
Request A Functional Visual Exam
Find Out How We Can Help You! 905-582-4800
Learn More About Vision Therapy?
Vision Therapy Can Improve Reading Skills In Children Thumbnail.jpg

Vision Therapy For Improved Reading Skills In Children

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Symptoms Indicating A Visual Efficiency Problem

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Children’s Vision Assessment

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Who is a Candidate for Vision Therapy

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Who Is A Candidate for Vision Therapy?

It may be difficult to understand that someone can see very clearly yet experience vision-related challenges. But that’s the reality for people who have an excellent ’20/20′ vision but lack what’s known as well-developed ‘visual skills’. The ability to track the path of a thrown ball or to read a sentence in a book both require well-developed visual skills. Such skills can be learned at any age.

We offer customized vision therapy to help people develop their visual skills and reach their potential, both at school and on the sports field.

Does Your Child Have Poor Visual Skills?

Some children and adults have lagging visual skills — even if they have excellent eyesight. They may misjudge the distance to the curb while riding a bike or driving a car, or lack the hand-brain coordination needed to easily catch a ball. While reading, they may inadvertently skip lines of text. The strain of reading may cause them to rub their eyes, suffer from headaches, become fatigued, lose concentration, or hold books too close to their eyes. This may also experience blurred during class or examinations. As a result, their reading comprehension lags, and homework goes undone.

In fact, up to 1 in 5 children have a visual problem that hinders learning, and unless addressed, the problem will persist into adulthood. Vision-related challenges affect a person’s performance in school, at work and even while playing sports. This, in turn, hampers one’s self-confidence and can thwart academic and even professional success.

What Is Vision Therapy and How Can It Help?

crayons coloring book coloring book

Vision therapy can significantly improve the way the eyes and brain work together to achieve clear and comfortable vision at all times.

Vision therapy begins with a functional eye examination to test for visual acuity, depth perception, and visual skills, and assess whether the eyes are working in tandem. If vision problems are identified, a customized vision therapy program will be prescribed to the child’s specific needs. It will include exercises taught in the office once or twice a week and reinforced through at-home training.

Who Can Benefit from Vision Therapy?

Vision therapy can help patients with the following eye conditions:

  • Amblyopia (“lazy eye”): the visual skills in one eye is weaker due to a stronger connection between the other eye and the brain
  • Strabismus (“crossed or turned eyes”): the eyes point in two different directions, either occasionally or permanently
  • Double vision
  • Binocular-vision problems: eye strain that results from the eyes being slightly misaligned and not working together as a team
  • Eye-movement disorders, difficulties scanning across a page or jumping between words
  • Accommodative disorders: trouble maintaining focus on a close-by object
  • Ocular motility dysfunctions: abnormal eye alignment or difficulty controlling large eye movements
  • Visual-perceptual problems: difficulty processing visual information
  • Vision problems resulting from developmental delays and acquired brain injuries

Vision therapy does not cure dyslexia or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). But many children and adults with these (at times misdiagnosed) conditions actually have poor visual skills, so a comprehensive eye exam is an important first step toward getting to the root of the issue.

Our practice serves patients from Oakville, Burlington, Halton, and Mississauga, Ontario and surrounding communities.

References:

 

Request A Functional Visual Exam
Find Out How We Can Help You! 905-582-4800
Learn More About Vision Therapy?
Vision Therapy Can Improve Reading Skills In Children Thumbnail.jpg

Vision Therapy For Improved Reading Skills In Children

Symptoms Indicating A Visual Efficiency Problem Thumbnail.jpg

Symptoms Indicating A Visual Efficiency Problem

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Thumbnail Kids

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Vision Therapy for Adults

Effective vision comes down to the way the brain and eyes interact. Whether reading words on a powerpoint presentation, working overtime, or sitting in front of a screen all day and typing endless emails, we rely on our visual system to work properly in order to succeed in these and other tasks.

Find Out How We Can Help You! 905-582-4800

Request A Functional Visual Exam

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You can excel in reading the charts on the wall, but still struggle with eye strain, headaches, fatigue, attention and concentration — all of which are performance-based criteria needed to meet work deadlines and effectively manage office-based stress. To excel in these areas, you need to have excellent visual skills. Fortunately, you can effectively improve vision skills through vision therapy.

What is Vision Therapy?


Vision Therapy is a customized regimen of individualized activities and exercises made to retrain the brain and eyes to work better as a team and improve visual functioning. The aim of vision therapy is to enhance vision processing skills such as eye-tracking, focusing and eye teaming abilities, as well as hand-eye coordination and visual processing speed. This is effective for those struggling with reading, memory, focus, balance, fixation —and a wide range of other visual tasks.

Contact A-Ha Vision to learn how Dr. Shirley Ha can help you function better in your day-to-day life.

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Who Can Benefit From Vision Therapy.png

Who Can Benefit From Vision Therapy?


A large number of patients have an undiagnosed vision condition that might be affecting their ability to function and succeed in their profession.

Vision therapy can help adults with conditions and symptoms related to:

  • Focusing issues
  • Eye fatigue
  • Double vision
  • Convergence Insufficiency
  • Traumatic Brain Injury
  • Anyone seeking to improve office performance

Vision Issues: What Symptoms Should You Look Out For?


Be on lookout for any symptoms listed below, as it may indicate that you have a vision issue.

  • Lazy eye, cross-eye,
  • Difficulty Reading
  • Difficulty staying focused
  • Poor hand-eye coordination
  • Constant squinting/head tilting
  • Favoring one eye over the other
  • Headaches or fatigue after reading or computer work

Find Out How We Can Help You! 905-582-4800

Request A Functional Visual Exam

man reading a book.png

How Does Vision Therapy Work?


Vision therapy consists of personalized exercises that make use of lenses, prisms, filters, occluders and other equipment aimed at developing visual skills and processing. Nowadays, thanks to advanced technologies and new computer-based therapies, doing and tracking home-based vision therapy exercises is easier than ever

Vision Therapy typically consists of a weekly 45-minute in-office appointment and approximately 15-minutes of assigned daily exercises. The vision therapy program can range from a few weeks to several months, depending on the severity of the diagnosis, eye health and compliance level.

Vision therapy involves close monitoring and follow-up appointments to ensure noticeable improvements in your visual functions. Over the course of the program, the eye doctor will decide how many visits are required in order to achieve optimal results.

How Long Does It Take to See Results with Vision Therapy?


It’s important to note that the goal of vision therapy is to improve functionality, not complete recovery.

For certain adults, gains can be experienced fairly soon. For others, it may take up to 6 months or more to realize significant results. Naturally, this depends on the patient, the unique therapy regimen and their adherence to the vision therapy program.

Is There an Age Limit to Vision Therapy?


There is no age limit. Because of the brain’s neuroplasticity, the brain remains dynamic and flexible throughout our lives. Just as with muscle training or learning to play an instrument, the more we practice, the more skillful we become and the better our visual function.

Does Vision Or Medical Insurance Cover The Cost Of Vision Therapy?


Vision therapy may be covered under major medical insurance plans (vision therapy is most often applied to a medical policy as opposed to a vision policy). However, certain insurance companies may deny or place severe limits on coverage for vision therapy as a cost-saving measure. When sorting out the insurance details for vision therapy, it’s important to know what questions to ask of your insurance agent or workplace HR department.

If you’re considering vision therapy, let us help you understand how to ask the right questions of your insurance company to determine whether you can get coverage.

The first step in determining whether vision therapy can help you with work or sports is to contact A-Ha Vision and schedule a comprehensive exam with Dr. Shirley Ha. Following the exam, Dr. Shirley Ha will provide a diagnosis and determine whether vision therapy is the best course of action. If so, you will be prescribed an individualized eye treatment program.

A-Ha Vision is committed to transforming lives through vision therapy.

Our practice serves patients from Oakville, Burlington, Halton, and Mississauga, Ontario and surrounding communities.

Find Out How We Can Help You! 905-582-4800

Request A Functional Visual Exam

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